The back-to-back champs remind us why loving what you do makes everything fall into place

By Klyde Manansala | Graphics by Tristan Tamayo courtesy of Inquirer.net

More than the number of incredible talents they have in every floor position, the Golden State Warriors’ strong bond and chemistry on and off the court is one of the many reasons they’re best at what they do.

The Warriors just won their third ring in four years after they effortlessly swept aside the Cleveland Cavaliers who struggled throughout the whole series—except for LeBron James, of course.

When it comes to winning games, the Dubs’ love for the competition and their hard work play a huge factor. But the back-to-back champs embrace a culture that makes their job easy: sharing fun and joy within the team.

Steve Kerr’s brilliant coaching is evident. He has been successful in orchestrating the Warriors’ well-executed plays—from floor spacing to creating open shots and even smooth ball movements. Having said that, we could only imagine how serious and disciplined the players are during team practices.

But are they really that serious during sessions?

Well, it turns out, Kerr and his squad inject an element that make them the team they are today. The Warriors described the first five to 10 minutes of their practice as a “complete circus” and “balls are just flying everywhere.”

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“I’ve told Steve, if someone came in and watched the way you practice, it would be embarrassing for you as a coach,” Bruce Fraser, assistant of Kerr, said in the same The New York Times report.

It’s chaos, as the players described it. Stephen Curry goes head to head with Kerr on a quick shooting contest before anything else. The craziness doesn’t stop there. The Warriors motivate themselves through extremely loud music. Long-distance and half court shots also became a routine they took pleasure in.

We don’t normally see coaches goof around with players, but Kerr and the Warriors took it to a level that set them apart from other teams. Through those five or 10 minutes of letting loose before serious practice, the whole team has built a certain amount of trust and respect with each other that keep their team intact.

The Warriors are champions for a reason. The joy they inflict on each other during practices adds up to their confidence, which then ignites their level of competitiveness. They’ve built a strong bond by being on the same page through the years—they go further than what they’re required to do and what the game demands, and it makes their job a lot easier.